Radicals for life the various forms of nitric oxide için kapak resmi
Başlık:
Radicals for life the various forms of nitric oxide
Dil:
English
ISBN:
9780444522368

9780080489599
Yayın Bilgileri:
Amsterdam ; Oxford : Elsevier, 2007.
Fiziksel Tanımlama:
1 online resource (xiv, 428 p.)
İçerik:
Part 1. Overview -- -- Part 2. DNIC: physico-chemical properties and biological activity -- -- Part 3. S-nitrosothiols: physico-chemical properties and biological activity -- -- Part 4. Nitrite as a NO source in cells and tissues -- -- Part 5. Dithiocarbamate iron complexes: implication for NO studies.
Özet:
Radicals for Life: the Various Forms of Nitric Oxide provides an up-to-date overview of the role of nitrosocompounds and nitrosyl-iron complexes in physiology. Nitrosocompounds can be considered as stabilised forms of nitric oxide, one of the most important regulatory molecules in physiology today. Many nitrosocompounds share some of the physiological functions of nitric oxide, and may be formed inside living organisms. This is the first book to be published that is dedicated to the role of such nitrosocompounds in physiology, with particular emphasis on the nitrosocompounds that are endogenously formed in higher organisms and humans. Points of discussion include: physical and chemical properties of the compounds, the main chemical pathways in vivo, as well as the physiological effects that have been recognised to date. Each of the nineteen chapters is written by distinguished specialists in the field, well known for their original and important contributions to the subject. Also included are results from a wide range of studies in vitro, in cell cultures, animal models and human volunteers. Examples of alternative forms of nitric oxide, with special emphasis on their protective role against widespread human diseases like atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, sexual dysfunction, and renal insufficiency to stroke and ischemia are also included. * First monograph to consider and provide an overview of endogenous nitrosocompounds and nitrosyl-iron complexes * Extensive bibliographic references, written by specialists of human physiology * Providing high scientific quality with a focus on implications for human diseases.

Mevcut:*

Materyal Türü
Demirbaş Numarası
Yer Numarası
Raf Konumu
Mevcut Konumu
Materyal Istek
E-Kitap 1300266-1001 QK898 .N58 R32 2007 eb Elsevier E-Kitap Koleksiyonu
Arıyor...

On Order

Özet

Özet

Radicals for Life: the Various Forms of Nitric Oxide provides an up-to-date overview of the role of nitrosocompounds and nitrosyl-iron complexes in physiology. Nitrosocompounds can be considered as stabilised forms of nitric oxide, one of the most important regulatory molecules in physiology today. Many nitrosocompounds share some of the physiological functions of nitric oxide, and may be formed inside living organisms. This is the first book to be published that is dedicated to the role of such nitrosocompounds in physiology, with particular emphasis on the nitrosocompounds that are endogenously formed in higher organisms and humans.

Points of discussion include: physical and chemical properties of the compounds, the main chemical pathways in vivo, as well as the physiological effects that have been recognised to date. Each of the nineteen chapters is written by distinguished specialists in the field, well known for their original and important contributions to the subject. Also included are results from a wide range of studies in vitro, in cell cultures, animal models and human volunteers.

Examples of alternative forms of nitric oxide, with special emphasis on their protective role against widespread human diseases like atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, sexual dysfunction, and renal insufficiency to stroke and ischemia are also included.


İçindekiler

Ernst van Faassen and Anatoly F. VaninAnatoly F. Vanin and Ernst van FaassenAnatoly F. Vanin and Eugenia B. ManukhinaDes R. RichardsonAnatoly F. Vanin and Ernst van FaassenM. Claire Kennedy and William E. Antholine and Helmut BeinertBruce Demple and Huangen Ding and Binbin Ren and Tiffany A. ReiterMagdalena Graziano and Lorenzo LamattinaErnst van Faassen and Anatoly F. VaninYi Yang and Joseph LoscalzoAnatoly F. Vanin and Ernst van FaassenDetcho A. Stoyanovsky and Timothy R. BilliarTienush Rassaf and Malte KelmErnst van Faassen and Anatoly F. Vanin and Anny Slama-SchwokAlexandre Samouilov and Haitao Li and Jay L. ZweierTetsuhiko YoshimuraGregory R.J. ThatcherAnatoly F. Vanin and Ernst van FaassenGalen M. Pieper
Forewordp. V
Part I Introductory overview
Chapter 1 Nitric oxide radicals and their reactionsp. 3
Referencesp. 13
Part II DNIC: physico-chemical properties and biological activity
Chapter 2 DNICs: physico-chemical properties and their observations in cells and tissuesp. 19
Introductionp. 19
Low-molecular-weight DNIC with thiol-containing ligandsp. 20
Vibration spectroscopy of nitrosyl ligands in DNICp. 28
Mossbauer ([gamma]-resonance) properties of low-molecular DNICs with thiol-containing ligandsp. 31
DNIC with sulfide and neocuproine anionic ligandsp. 34
Protein-bound DNICsp. 37
Laboratory synthesis of DNIC with low-molecular anionic ligandsp. 42
The mechanism for assembly of DNIC with thiol-containing ligandsp. 44
Stability of low-molecular-weight and protein-bound DNICs in anaerobic or aerobic solutionsp. 47
Geometric structure and electronic configuration of DNIC in solution and crystalline statep. 48
Observations of DNICs in cells and tissuesp. 56
Loosely bound iron participates in the formation of DNICp. 66
Concluding remarksp. 67
Acknowledgmentp. 67
Referencesp. 67
Chapter 3 Hypotensive, vasodilatory and anti-aggregative properties of dinitrosyl-iron complexesp. 75
Hypotensive activity of DNICsp. 75
The vasodilatory activity of DNICsp. 87
Role of DNIC/nitric oxide stores in protection against nitric oxide overproductionp. 90
DNIC capacity of inhibiting platelet aggregationp. 92
Acknowledgmentp. 94
Referencesp. 94
Chapter 4 DNICs and intracellular iron: nitrogen monoxide (NO)-mediated iron release from cells is linked to NO-mediated glutathione efflux via MRP1p. 97
General introduction: nitrogen monoxide is a vital messenger molecule and cytotoxic effectorp. 97
Nitrogen monoxide forms intracellular complexes with ironp. 97
Cellular iron metabolismp. 98
Iron transport and uptake: transferrin and the transferrin receptor 1p. 100
Effect of nitrogen monoxide on intracellular iron metabolismp. 100
The mechanism of nitrogen monoxide-mediated Fe release from cellsp. 102
Nitrogen monoxide mediates iron export from cells by the GSH transporter, MRP1p. 105
Biological relevance of nitrogen monoxide-mediated transport via MRP1p. 106
Conclusionsp. 112
Acknowledgmentsp. 112
Referencesp. 113
Chapter 5 Low-molecular dinitrosyl iron complexes can catalyze the degradation of active centers of iron-sulfur proteinsp. 119
Acknowledgmentp. 135
Referencesp. 135
Chapter 6 Products of the reaction of cytosolic and mitochondrial aconitases with nitric oxidep. 139
Acknowledgmentp. 144
Referencesp. 144
Chapter 7 Harnessing toxic reactions to signal stress: reactions of nitric oxide with iron-sulfur centers and the informative case of SoxR proteinp. 147
Introductionp. 147
DNICs and nitric oxide toxicityp. 149
SoxR as a sensor of oxidative stress or nitric oxidep. 149
Repair of protein DNICsp. 151
L-Cysteine releases ferrous iron from the protein-bound DNICp. 153
Iron-sulfur clusters can be re-assembled to replace DNICp. 153
New nitric oxide signaling pathways via FeS clustersp. 155
A model for SoxR activation in response to multiple signalsp. 155
Perspectivep. 156
Acknowledgmentsp. 157
Referencesp. 157
Chapter 8 Nitric oxide and dinitrosyl iron complexes: roles in plant iron sensing and metabolismp. 161
Nitric oxide functions in plantsp. 161
Nitric oxide synthesis in plantsp. 162
Nitric oxide storage, delivery and detoxification in plantsp. 162
DNICs in plantsp. 163
Plant iron nutrition: an overviewp. 164
Nitric oxide and DNICs participation in plant iron metabolismp. 165
Perspectivesp. 166
Acknowledgmentsp. 167
Referencesp. 167
Part III Nitrosospecies and S-nitrosothiols: physico-chemical properties and biological activity
Chapter 9 Low-molecular-weight S-nitrosothiolsp. 173
Spectroscopic propertiesp. 175
Synthesis and detection in vitro and in vivop. 175
Stability of GSNO in vitrop. 179
Stability of RSNO in vivop. 184
Transport of LMW S-nitrosothiolsp. 186
Biological actions of LMW nitrosothiolsp. 187
First category effectsp. 187
Second category effectsp. 190
Third category effectsp. 191
Therapeutic uses of LMW nitrosothiolsp. 191
Referencesp. 193
Chapter 10 S-nitrosated proteins: formation, metabolism, and functionp. 201
Introductionp. 201
Biological chemistryp. 201
Synthesisp. 201
Transportp. 202
Biological formationp. 202
Metabolism of S-nitrosothiolsp. 203
Physiological distribution of S-nitrosothiolsp. 204
Detectionp. 205
Photolysis-chemiluminescencep. 206
Saville-Griess methodp. 206
Diaminofluorescein gelsp. 206
Mass spectrometryp. 206
Immunohistochemistryp. 207
Chemical labelingp. 207
Proteomicsp. 207
Function of S-nitrosothiolsp. 208
Energy metabolismp. 209
Protein degradation and apoptosisp. 209
Transcription factorsp. 209
Membrane ion channelsp. 210
Kinases and phosphatasep. 211
Conclusionsp. 211
Acknowledgmentsp. 212
Referencesp. 212
Chapter 11 Chemical equilibria between S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligandsp. 223
Introductionp. 223
The redox reactions of copperp. 224
Decomposition and synthesis of S-nitrosothiols by ironp. 225
The experiments with neocuproine show that decomposition and synthesis of RS-NO are catalyzed by copper as well as ironp. 226
The mechanism of catalytic decomposition of RS-NO by ferrous ironp. 231
The mechanism of RS-NO synthesis catalyzed by ironp. 240
The equilibria between thiol-DNIC and RS-NOp. 245
Nitrosothiols are nitric oxide donors through their transformation into DNICsp. 247
Acknowledgmentp. 250
Referencesp. 251
Chapter 12 Cellular non-heme iron modulates apoptosis and caspase 3 activityp. 253
Introductionp. 253
Summary of observationsp. 254
Formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes parallels the inhibition of caspase 3 in NO-treated RAW264.7 cellsp. 254
Mechanistic considerationsp. 255
Redox regulation of caspase 3 activityp. 255
NO inhibits apoptosis by preventing increases in caspase 3-like activity via two distinct mechanismsp. 257
Enzymatic denitrosation of caspase 3p. 257
Chelation of metal ions by caspase 3p. 258
Iron complexes containing thiyl and NO ligandsp. 259
Copper-nitrosyl complexesp. 261
Conclusionsp. 262
Referencesp. 263
Chapter 13 Nitrite and nitrosospecies in blood and tissue: approaching the gap between bench and bedsidep. 269
Nitric oxide and red blood cellsp. 270
RBC: a novel source for nitric oxidep. 271
Nitric oxide and plasmap. 272
Nitrosospecies other than RSNOs in plasmap. 273
Nitric oxide solutionsp. 273
Nitric oxide can be transported in its free form along the vascular treep. 274
Plasma RSNOs as potential disease markersp. 274
Analysis of nitric oxide species: finding the right approachp. 275
Plasma nitrosospecies and cardiovascular diseasep. 276
Effects of nitric oxide and RSNOs on left ventricular functionp. 277
Plasma nitrite and eNOS-activityp. 277
Origin of plasma nitritep. 280
Nitrite signalingp. 280
Nitrite and diagnosticsp. 281
Tissue stores of nitric oxidep. 281
Summaryp. 282
Part IV Nitrites and nitrates as a NO source in cells and tissues
Chapter 14 Nitrite as endothelial NO donor under anoxiap. 291
Aqueous reduction pathways of nitritep. 294
In vitro experiments on eNOS in buffered solutionp. 295
Experiments on endothelial cell culturesp. 298
Mechanistic hypothesisp. 302
Nitric oxide is released from full-length eNOS but not from nNOS under anoxiap. 304
Comparison of the rates of nitric oxide geminate recombination to the heme of eNOS and of nNOSp. 306
Implications for human physiologyp. 308
Referencesp. 309
Chapter 15 Nitrite as NO donor in cells and tissuesp. 313
Introductionp. 313
Xanthine oxidase-catalyzed nitrite reductionp. 314
Effect of oxygen on XO-mediated nitric oxide generation from nitritep. 319
Measurement of nitric oxide formation in ischemic myocardiump. 323
Evaluation of the role of nitrite-derived nitric oxide in postischemic injuryp. 326
Nitrosyl-heme formation and nitric oxide signaling during brief myocardial ischemiap. 327
Conclusionp. 331
Referencesp. 331
Chapter 16 The anti-microbial and cytotoxic actions of nitrite, and the use of DNIC as a marker for these actionsp. 337
Introductionp. 337
The anti-microbial and cytotoxic activities of nitritep. 338
Nitrite acts as a colorant, flavorant, antioxidant and anti-botulinal agent in cured meatp. 338
Ingested nitrate may be reduced to nitrite, which plays numerous roles in the stomachp. 339
DNIC may be used as a biomarker for the anti-microbial and cytotoxic actions of nitritep. 341
Concluding remarksp. 342
Acknowledgmentsp. 343
Referencesp. 343
Chapter 17 Organic nitrates and nitrites as stores of NO bioactivityp. 347
Introductionp. 347
Nitrate therapeuticsp. 348
Nitrite therapeuticsp. 351
Nitrates as nitric oxide mimeticsp. 351
Endogenous nitrates and nitritesp. 355
Chemical reactivity of nitratesp. 356
Thionitratesp. 357
Chemical reactivity of nitritesp. 358
Biological reactivity of nitrates and bioactivationp. 359
Pathways for reduction to nitric oxidep. 361
Via inorganic nitritep. 362
Via organic nitritep. 363
Via thionitratep. 363
Protein mediators of biotransformationp. 364
Nitrate tolerancep. 368
Summaryp. 369
Referencesp. 369
Part V Dithiocarbamate iron complexes: implication for NO studies
Chapter 18 Mononitrosyl-iron complexes with dithiocarbamate ligands: physico-chemical propertiesp. 383
Introductionp. 383
Ligand structure of iron-dithiocarbamate complexesp. 385
Trapping of free nitric oxide by iron-dithiocarbamate complexesp. 385
Spectroscopic properties of (nitrosylated) iron-dithiocarbamate complexesp. 389
Isotopic substitutions affect the EPR lineshapes of the MNIC adductsp. 391
The determinants of MNIC formation in tissues: redox state and ligands of ironp. 392
Reduction with dithionite enhances MNIC yields in vivop. 394
Other effects of reduction on EPR spectrap. 396
Prevention of reduction of endogenous nitrite by bufferingp. 397
Different ligands compete with DETC for exogenous iron in tissuesp. 399
Different ligands compete with DETC for exogenous iron in cultured endothelial cellsp. 399
Loosely bound iron participates in the redox equilibriump. 400
Endogenous compounds as impostors for true nitric oxidep. 401
The meaning of the ferric high-spin signal at g = 4.3p. 402
Concluding remarksp. 402
Referencesp. 403
Chapter 19 Protection against allograft rejection by iron-dithiocarbamate complexesp. 407
Introductionp. 407
Role of iNOS in cardiac rejection: evidence from pharmacological approachesp. 407
Role of iNOS in cardiac rejection: evidence from gene deletion strategiesp. 409
Effects of iron-dithiocarbamates on graft survival and rejectionp. 409
Evidence that iron-dithiocarbamates act in vivo to scavenge nitric oxidep. 410
Iron-dithiocarbamates for quantifying nitric oxide levelsp. 414
Effect of iron-dithiocarbamates to inhibit targets of nitric oxidep. 414
Anti-inflammatory actions of dithiocarbamatesp. 417
Effects on lymphocyte activation and proliferationp. 417
The role of nitric oxide in lymphocyte proliferationp. 418
Other actions of iron-dithiocarbamates involving immunosuppressionp. 418
Conclusionp. 419
Acknowledgmentsp. 419
Referencesp. 419
Indexp. 423