Secure roaming in 802.11 networks için kapak resmi
Başlık:
Secure roaming in 802.11 networks
Dil:
English
ISBN:
9780750682114

9780080548944
Yayın Bilgileri:
Amsterdam ; Boston : Newnes/Elsevier, c2007.
Fiziksel Tanımlama:
1 online resource (xxiv, 343 p.) : ill., maps
Seri:
Communications engineering series

Communications engineering series.
Özet:
This book explores the fundamental concepts, basic theory, and key principles of 802.11 networks with roaming capabilities. Today, we increasingly expect to find public Wide Local Area Network (WLAN) 802.11 access in our airports, public spaces, and hotels, and we want to maintain our connections when were mobile and using 802.11 WLANs. However, 802.11 was not originally designed with roaming capabilities and cant, in its pure form, support seamless roaming between different hotspots and other 802.11 access points. This book details the theory behind various 802.11 extensions to permit roaming and describes how these extensions can be successfully implemented in 802.11 WLANs. Coverage of User Authentication in 802.11 is reviewed as is roaming between 802.11 and other wireless technologies. Wireless technologies and application programming interfaces are given their due with generous coverage as well. * Offers a comprehensive treatise on Wi-Fi 802.11 roaming by comparing/contrasting it to cellular roaming theory and techniques * Emerges as a "one stop" resource for design engineers charged with fulfilling the market need for seamless 802.11 device roaming capabilities * Builds upon the knowledge base of a professional audience without delving into long discussions of theory long since mastered.

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Özet

Özet

Secure Roaming in 802.11 Networks offers a comprehensive treatise on Wi-Fi 802.11 roaming by comparing/contrasting it to cellular roaming theory and techniques. The book explores the fundamental concepts, basic theory, and key principles of 802.11 networks with roaming capabilities. It helps ensure secure and constant connectivity of laptops, PDAs and other emerging mobile devices.

Today, we increasingly expect to find public Wide Local Area Network (WLAN) 802.11 access in our airports, public spaces, and hotels, and we want to maintain our connections when we're mobile and using 802.11 WLANs. However, 802.11 was not originally designed with roaming capabilities and can't, in its "pure" form, support seamless roaming between different hotspots and other 802.11 access points. This book details the theory behind various 802.11 extensions to permit roaming and describes how these extensions can be successfully implemented in 802.11 WLANs. It reviews coverage of user authentication in 802.11, as well as roaming between 802.11 and other wireless technologies. It also discusses wireless technologies and application programming interfaces.

This book will appeal to RF/wireless engineers and designers, computer/data network engineers, and graduate students.


Yazar Notları

Dr. Paul Goransson has over 28 years of experience in the data communications field. He was the founder and President of Meetinghouse, which developed network access security software products for wireless and wired environments. Meetinghouse was acquired by Cisco Systems in 2006, where Paul currently serves as a Director of Engineering in the Wireless Networking Business Unit. He is also the owner/operator of Bondgarden Farm, a commercial beef and hay farm in southern Maine. Paul previously founded Qosnetics and QARobotics, which were later merged and subsequently acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 1999. Dr. Goransson has published technical articles in the fields of bandwidth reservation and wireless security. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Brandeis University in 1975, his Masters of Science in Computer Engineering from Boston University in 1981, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of New Hampshire in 1994. Dr. Goransson has previously served as an adjunct Professor at the School of Computing at Armstrong Atlantic State University.

Dr. Raymond Greenlaw is the Founder and Dean of the School of Computing and Professor of Computer Science at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Georgia. Ray is the Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at Chiang Mai University in Thailand and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the College of Management and Technology in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He is the author of 13 books in the field of computer science. His books cover complexity theory, graph theory, the Internet, networking, operating systems, parallel computing, the theory of computation, and the World Wide Web. Dr. Greenlaw has published 60 research papers and given over 155 invited lectures throughout the world. As a PI or co-PI, Ray has been awarded over $6,000,000 in grants and contracts, and his research has been supported by the following countries: Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, and the United States. He has won numerous international awards including three Senior Fulbright Fellowships, a Humboldt Fellowship, a Japanese Society for Promotion of Science Fellowship, two visiting Professor Fellowships from Italy, a Sasakawa Fellowship for Japanese Studios, and a Spanish Fellowship for Science and Technology. Dr. Greenlaw served as the Regional Coordinator for the State of Georgia's $100,000,000 Yamacraw Project, which was designed to make the state of Georgia a leader in the telecommunications field. Ray serves as a Commissioner for the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering Technology (ABET). He received a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics from Pomona College in 1983, a Master of Science in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1986, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1988.


İçindekiler

Prefacep. xv
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Authors' Notep. xxi
About the Authorsp. xxiii
Chapter 1 Introductionp. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 1
1.2 Basic Networking Terminology and Conventionsp. 3
1.3 Setting the Scenep. 5
1.3.1 Introductionp. 5
1.3.2 Precellular Wireless Networks and the Birth of the Cellular Conceptp. 6
1.3.3 802.11 Arrives on the Scenep. 8
1.4 Different Notions of Roamingp. 8
1.5 Big Cells, Little Cellsp. 12
1.5.1 Introductionp. 12
1.5.2 RF Technology and Transmit Powerp. 13
1.5.3 Number of Active Users in a Cellp. 13
1.5.4 Overview of Quality of Service Requirementsp. 14
1.5.5 Complexity of Network Design and Implementationp. 16
1.5.6 Frequency and Speed of Roamingp. 16
1.5.7 Impact on 802.11 Cell Sizep. 16
1.6 Authentication, Authorization, Accounting, and Roamingp. 17
1.7 How Fast Do We Roam on the Range?p. 19
1.7.1 Speed of Travelp. 20
1.7.2 Size of Overlapping Cell Coverage Areap. 20
1.7.3 Application's Tolerance for Disruption in User Data Flowp. 20
1.7.4 Complexity of Accomplishing the Roamp. 21
1.8 Taxonomy for Roamingp. 21
1.8.1 Network Cell Modelsp. 21
1.8.2 A Handoff Modelp. 23
1.8.3 Hard Handoffsp. 26
1.8.4 Soft Handoffsp. 26
1.8.5 Comparison of 802.11 and Cellular Roamingp. 26
1.9 Organization of the Bookp. 27
Referencesp. 28
Chapter 2 Cellular Telephony: Wireless Roaming Pioneersp. 29
2.1 Introductionp. 29
2.2 The Future of Computingp. 30
2.3 Basic Conceptsp. 31
2.4 Early History of Radio Telephonyp. 32
2.4.1 Introductionp. 32
2.4.2 Precellular Erap. 32
2.4.3 Advanced Mobile Phone Systemp. 35
2.4.4 Analog Systems in Europe and Japanp. 38
2.5 The Digital Revolutionp. 40
2.5.1 Introductionp. 40
2.5.2 Global System for Mobile Communicationsp. 41
2.5.3 North American TDMA (IS-54)p. 46
2.5.4 Japanese Systemsp. 47
2.5.5 Focus on CDMA and Soft Handoffp. 48
2.6 Soft Versus Hard Handoffs in Various Cellular Technologiesp. 50
2.7 The Quest for Convergencep. 51
2.7.1 Introductionp. 51
2.7.2 High-Speed Circuit-Switched Datap. 51
2.7.3 General Packet Radio Servicep. 52
2.7.4 Roaming for Data Applications in GPRSp. 55
2.7.5 Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolutionp. 57
2.8 Summaryp. 60
Referencesp. 60
Chapter 3 Roaming m 802.11 WLANs: General Principlesp. 63
3.1 Introductionp. 63
3.2 Primer on the 802.11 Standardp. 64
3.2.1 Introductionp. 64
3.2.2 Beacons and Probesp. 64
3.2.3 Channels in 802.11p. 66
3.2.4 Basic Service Setp. 68
3.2.5 Active and Passive Scanningp. 69
3.2.6 Associationp. 72
3.2.7 Contention-Based Accessp. 74
3.2.8 Rate Adaptation in 802.11p. 76
3.2.9 Other 802.11 Framesp. 77
3.3 Introduction to 802.11 Roamingp. 79
3.3.1 Extended Service Setp. 79
3.3.2 Example of Multiple ESSs in Operationp. 80
3.3.3 Phases of 802.11 Roamingp. 81
3.4 Local Roamingp. 86
3.4.1 Introductionp. 86
3.4.2 Scanning Tradeoffsp. 87
3.4.3 Assumptions about Local Roaming and IP Subnetsp. 88
3.5 Global Roamingp. 88
3.5.1 Introductionp. 88
3.5.2 Multiple Alternative SSIDsp. 90
3.6 Mobile IP and Its Role in 802.11 Roamingp. 92
3.6.1 Introductionp. 92
3.6.2 Review of the Mobile-IP Architecturep. 92
3.6.3 802.11 Global Roaming with Mobile IPp. 95
3.6.4 Alternatives to Mobile IPp. 96
3.7 Those Pesky Laws of Physicsp. 97
3.7.1 Picocells-A Double-Edged Swordp. 97
3.7.2 Limitations on Avoiding Channel Overlapp. 97
Referencesp. 98
Chapter 4 Dynamics of 802.11 Task Groupsp. 101
4.1 Introductionp. 101
4.2 Evolution of an IEEE Standardp. 102
4.2.1 Introductionp. 102
4.2.2 New Standardsp. 103
4.2.3 Chairs and More on Ballotingp. 104
4.2.4 Timeline of 802.11 Task Groupsp. 106
4.3 Battle for Speed, Cost, and Market Dominancep. 106
4.3.1 Market Dynamicsp. 106
4.3.2 Innovationp. 107
4.3.3 Recent Historyp. 108
4.4 The 802.11 Standard's Physical Layerp. 108
4.4.1 Introductionp. 108
4.4.2 Deployments and the Playersp. 109
4.5 Fast Secure Roaming Task Groupsp. 111
4.5.1 Introductionp. 111
4.5.2 Basic Architectural Servicesp. 111
4.5.3 Workgroup Focip. 112
4.6 802.11i Securityp. 112
4.6.1 Introductionp. 112
4.6.2 WEP's Limitationsp. 114
4.6.3 802.11 Cipherp. 114
4.6.4 Preauthenticationp. 116
4.7 802.11e Quality of Servicep. 117
4.7.1 Introductionp. 117
4.7.2 Mixed Environment Terminologyp. 118
4.7.3 Miscellaneous Issuesp. 120
4.8 802.11k Radio Resource Measurement Enhancementsp. 120
4.8.1 Introductionp. 120
4.8.2 Station Statistics Requestp. 122
4.8.3 Additional Reports Important to Roamingp. 123
4.9 802.11r Roamingp. 124
4.9.1 Introductionp. 124
4.9.2 Basic Service Set Transition Pre-802.11rp. 125
4.9.3 How 802.11r Handles the BSS Transitionp. 125
4.10 Other 802.11 Subgroupsp. 127
4.11 Wi-Fi Alliance Versus IEEE 802.11p. 128
4.11.1 Introduction to the Wi-Fi Alliancep. 128
4.11.2 Wi-Fi Alliance Certificationp. 129
4.11.3 IETF Versus IEEE 802p. 130
Referencesp. 131
Chapter 5 Practical Aspects of Basic 802.11 Roamingp. 133
5.1 Introductionp. 133
5.2 The Driver and Client in an 802.11 Stationp. 134
5.2.1 Introductionp. 134
5.2.2 Driver Functionsp. 134
5.2.3 Client Functionsp. 139
5.2.4 Scanning Considerationsp. 141
5.2.5 Background Scanningp. 144
5.2.6 Scanning Timersp. 149
5.2.7 Pitfalls with Scanning: Real-Life Examplep. 151
5.2.8 SyncScan: Enhancement to Background Scanningp. 152
5.3 Detailed Analyses of Real-Life Roamsp. 153
5.3.1 Introductionp. 153
5.3.2 Tools Used in Roaming Studyp. 153
5.3.3 Wi-Fi Alliance's WPA Simple Roaming Testp. 154
5.4 Dissection of a Global Roamp. 156
5.4.1 Test-Bed Description for Global Roamp. 156
5.4.2 Test Results for Global Roamp. 156
5.5 Dissection of a Local Roamp. 159
5.5.1 Test Description for Local Roamp. 159
5.5.2 Test Results for Local Roamp. 159
5.5.3 A Closer Look at Roaming Delayp. 162
5.6 Access-Point Placement Methodologiesp. 164
5.6.1 Introductionp. 164
5.6.2 Access-Point Placementp. 165
5.6.3 Site Surveys for Access-Point Placementp. 165
5.6.4 Self-Monitoring 802.11 Networksp. 166
Referencesp. 167
Chapter 6 Fundamentals of User Authentication in 802.11p. 169
6.1 Introductionp. 169
6.2 802.1X Port-Level Authenticationp. 170
6.2.1 Introductionp. 170
6.2.2 Flexibility of 802.1Xp. 171
6.2.3 Evolution of 802.1Xp. 172
6.3 The AAA Serverp. 173
6.3.1 Introductionp. 173
6.3.2 Remarks about TACACS and DIAMETERp. 174
6.3.3 The RADIUS Protocolp. 174
6.3.4 The RADIUS Protocol in Usep. 176
6.4 The Extensible Authentication Protocolp. 177
6.4.1 Introductionp. 177
6.4.2 The EAP State Machinep. 178
6.4.3 Prominent EAP Methodsp. 179
6.5 Flexible and Strong Authentication in 802.11p. 184
6.5.1 Introductionp. 184
6.5.2 Basic Authentication Process in 802.11p. 184
6.5.3 Discussion of Tunneling in EAP Methodsp. 186
6.6 Other 802.11 Authentication Methodologiesp. 187
6.6.1 Introductionp. 187
6.6.2 MAC-Based Authenticationp. 187
6.6.3 Web-Based Authenticationp. 188
6.7 Network Access Controlp. 188
6.7.1 Introductionp. 188
6.7.2 Cisco Network Admission Controlp. 189
6.7.3 Trusted Network Connectp. 190
6.7.4 Microsoft's Network Access Protectionp. 191
6.8 Summaryp. 192
Referencesp. 192
Chapter 7 Roaming Securely in 802.11p. 195
7.1 Introductionp. 195
7.2 The 802.11 Security Staircasep. 196
7.2.1 Introductionp. 196
7.2.2 Evolution of Security Technologiesp. 197
7.3 Preauthentication in 802.11ip. 198
7.3.1 Introductionp. 198
7.3.2 Steps Involved in 802.11i Preauthenticationp. 198
7.4 Detailed Analysis of Real-Life Secured Roamsp. 200
7.4.1 Introductionp. 200
7.5 Dissection of a WPA-PSK Protected Roamp. 201
7.5.1 Test Description for WPA-PSK Roamp. 201
7.5.2 Test Results for WPA-PSK Roamp. 202
7.6 Dissection of a WPA2 Enterprise Roamp. 203
7.6.1 Introductionp. 203
7.6.2 Test Description for WPA2 Enterprise Roamp. 204
7.6.3 Test Results for WPA2 Enterprise Roamp. 206
7.7 Dissection of an 802.11i Preauthenticationp. 210
7.7.1 Introductionp. 210
7.7.2 Test Description for Preauthenticationp. 210
7.7.3 Test Results for Preauthenticationp. 210
7.8 Summaryp. 218
Chapter 8 Proprietary Solutions for Roaming in 802.11 Networksp. 219
8.1 Introductionp. 219
8.2 Voice over Wireless IP Roamingp. 220
8.2.1 Introductionp. 220
8.2.2 Voice over Wireless IP Primerp. 220
8.2.3 Voice over IP Protocolsp. 222
8.2.4 Voice over Wi-Fi-VoIP's Newest Childp. 223
8.2.3 Spectralink Voice Priority (SVP)p. 224
8.3 Opportunistic Key Cachingp. 227
8.3.1 Introductionp. 227
8.3.2 Cisco's Centralized Key Management (CCKM)p. 228
8.4 Centralized Wireless Switch Architecturesp. 229
8.4.1 Introductionp. 229
8.4.2 MAC Processingp. 229
8.4.3 LWAPP, CAPWAP, and SLAPPp. 230
8.4.4 Using Tunnels to Keep Roams Localp. 231
8.5 Summaryp. 233
Referencesp. 234
Chapter 9 The 802.11 Workgroups' Solutions for Fast Secure Roamingp. 235
9.1 Introductionp. 235
9.2 Overview of the 802.11r Standardp. 236
9.3 Detailed Concepts and Terminology of 802.11rp. 238
9.3.1 Introductionp. 238
9.3.2 Architectural Elements of 802.11rp. 240
9.3.3 New Security Conceptsp. 242
9.3.4 Resource Reservationsp. 245
9.3.5 Information Elementsp. 247
9.4 Protocol Exchanges in 802.11rp. 250
9.4.1 Introductionp. 250
9.4.2 Fast BSS Transition Over the Air, No QoS, and No Securityp. 251
9.4.3 Fast BSS Transition Over the DS, No QoS, and No Securityp. 252
9.4.4 Fast BSS Transition with QoS and Securityp. 254
9.5 The 802.11k Standard Applied to Roamingp. 257
9.5.1 Introductionp. 257
9.5.2 New Information Elements Defined by 802.11kp. 258
9.5.3 Utility of 802.11kp. 261
9.5.4 Limitations of 802.11kp. 264
9.6 Concluding Remarksp. 264
Referencesp. 265
Chapter 10 Roaming between 802.11 and Other Wireless Technologiesp. 267
10.1 Introductionp. 267
10.1.1 Vertical Versus Horizontal Roamingp. 268
10.2 Ideal Roaming Experiencep. 270
10.2.1 Introductionp. 270
10.2.2 Enterprise Data Userp. 270
10.2.3 Voice Userp. 271
10.3 IEEE 802.16: WiMAXp. 271
10.3.1 Interactions between 802.11 and 802.16p. 272
10.4 IEEE 802.15.1: Bluetoothp. 273
10.4.1 Introductionp. 273
10.4.2 Bluetooth's Relationship with 802.11p. 273
10.5 Relevant Standards Bodies and Industry Organizationsp. 274
10.6 Third Generation Partnership Programp. 276
10.6.1 Introductionp. 276
10.6.2 Vertical Roaming Issuesp. 277
10.6.3 Interworking between 3GPP and 802.11p. 279
10.6.4 Five Levels of Interoperabilityp. 280
10.6.5 Seamless Roaming between CS and PS Servicesp. 282
10.7 UMA: A Transitional Step for 3GPPp. 286
10.8 Third Generation Partnership Program 2p. 287
10.9 The 802.21 Standardp. 289
10.10 Summaryp. 294
Referencesp. 294
Chapter 11 Fixture Directionsp. 297
11.1 Introductionp. 297
11.2 Survey of Ongoing Work Related to 802.11p. 298
11.2.1 Introductionp. 298
11.2.2 Mobile 802.11p. 298
11.2.3 Securityp. 303
11.2.4 Quality of Servicep. 305
11.3 A Mobility Model for Studying Wireless Communicationp. 307
11.3.1 Introductionp. 307
11.3.2 The Mobility Modelp. 307
11.3.3 Problem Definitionsp. 311
11.4 Conclusionsp. 312
Referencesp. 313
Appendix A Acronyms and Abbreviationp. 5
Appendix B List of Figuresp. 327
Appendix C List of Tablesp. 332
Indexp. 333