A Global View of Business Insolvency Systems. için kapak resmi
Başlık:
A Global View of Business Insolvency Systems.
ISBNp:
9789004182530
Dil:
English
Edisyon:
1st ed.
Yayın Bilgileri:
Leiden :

BRILL,

2009.

©2010.
Fiziksel Tanımlama:
1 online resource (318 pages)
İçerik:
Intro -- About the Authors -- Foreword -- Chapter One: Introduction -- Chapter Two: Systems for the Enforcement of Debt -- 2.0. Overview -- 2.1. Enforcement of Unsecured Rights -- 2.1.1. Enforcement of Unsecured Debt in General -- 2.1.2. Types of Property Seizable -- 2.1.3. Exempt Property -- 2.1.4. Enforcement Process -- 2.1.5. Third Parties -- 2.1.6. Priorities -- 2.1.7. Provisional Remedies -- 2.1.8. Cross-Border Enforcement of Judgments -- 2.2. Secured Credit Systems -- 2.2.1. Personal Guarantees -- 2.2.2. Security Interests Generally -- 2.2.3. Title Retention -- 2.2.3.1. Generally -- 2.2.3.2. Ambiguity of Interests -- 2.2.4. Obtaining a Valid Security Interest -- 2.2.5. Types of Liens Permitted -- 2.2.6. Constraints on Secured Transactions -- 2.2.7. Enforcement -- 2.2.8. Priority -- 2.2.8.1. Publicity -- 2.2.8.2. Exemptions -- 2.2.8.3. Registration -- 2.2.8.4. OtherMethods of Publicity -- 2.2.8.5. Extent of Priority -- 2.2.8.6. Proceeds -- 2.2.9. Setoff (Offset) -- 2.2.10. Cross-Border -- 2.2.11. Consolidation of Laws -- 2.2.12. International Initiatives -- 2.2.13. Immovables (Real Estate) -- 2.2.14. Theoretical Debates -- Chapter Three: Corporate Insolvency Legislation -- 3.0. Introduction -- 3.1. The Liquidation/Rehabilitation Dynamic -- 3.2. Valuation -- 3.3. Director and Officer Liability -- 3.3.1. Comparative Legislative Survey -- 3.3.1.1. Background: Common Law/Case Law Approach -- 3.3.1.2. Specific Insolvency Law Statutory Provisions -- 3.3.1.2.1. Fraudulent Trading -- 3.3.1.2.2. Wrongful/Insolvent Trading -- 3.3.1.2.3. Directors' Disqualification and Overall Risk of Liability of Directors -- 3.3.2. Relationship Between Director and Officer Liability and Corporate Governance -- 3.4. Scope and Commencement of Insolvency Cases -- 3.4.1. Scope of Application.

3.4.1.1. Financial Institutions, Insurance Companies, Regulated Industries, and Other Groups -- 3.4.1.2. State-Owned Enterprises -- 3.4.2. Defining Insolvency -- 3.4.3. Commencement Criteria -- 3.4.4. Assets Administered in Insolvency -- 3.5. Moratoriumand Suspension of Actions -- 3.5.1. Lawsuits -- 3.5.2. State Regulatory Actions -- 3.5.3. Other Exceptions -- 3.5.4. Secured Creditors -- 3.5.4.1. Protection -- 3.5.4.2. Receivership Regimes -- 3.5.5. "Gap" Moratorium -- 3.6. Governance: Management -- 3.6.1. Administrator/Debtor in Possession -- 3.6.1.1. Liquidation -- 3.6.1.2. Rehabilitation -- 3.6.1.3. Administrator's Financial Responsibility -- 3.6.2. Governance: Creditors and Creditors' Committees -- 3.6.2.1. Organization of Creditors -- 3.6.2.2. Creditors' Committee Functions -- 3.6.2.3. Transparency and Approval Rights -- 3.6.2.4. Organization of Creditors' Committees -- 3.7. Administration: Collection, Preservation, and Disposition of Property -- 3.7.1. Rights of Secured Creditors -- 3.7.2. Retention of Title Claimants -- 3.7.3. Other Priorities -- 3.7.4. Procedure -- 3.8. Disposing of the Debtor's Assets -- 3.9. Contracts -- 3.9.1. Introduction -- 3.9.2. Decision to Terminate the Contract -- 3.9.3. Decision to Continue the Contract -- 3.9.4. Risks to Counterparties -- 3.9.5. Assignment of Contracts -- 3.9.6. Procedure -- 3.9.7. Special Contracts -- 3.9.8. Leases -- 3.9.9. Setoff, Netting, and Derivatives -- 3.10.Avoiding Pre-Proceeding Transfers -- 3.10.1. Generally -- 3.10.2. Intentional Fraud -- 3.10.3. Transactions at an Undervalue -- 3.10.4. Preferential Transfers -- 3.10.5. Defenses -- 3.10.5.1. Defenses to Avoidance Other Than Preferential -- 3.10.5.2. Defenses to Preferential Transfer Avoidance -- 3.10.6. Suspect Periods -- 3.10.7. Security Interests -- 3.10.8. Procedure -- 3.11.Avoiding Post-Insolvency Transfers.

3.12. Special Treatment of Partnerships -- Chapter Four: Corporate Rehabilitation Proceedings -- 4.0. Introduction -- 4.1. History and Key Issues -- 4.1.1. Formal and Informal Rescue and Rehabilitation Regimes -- 4.1.2. Survival of the Business and Liquidation -- 4.1.3. A Single or a Dual Gateway? -- 4.2. Structural Features of Rehabilitation Statutes -- 4.2.1. Access -- 4.2.2. Timely and Efficient Administration of the Proceedings -- 4.2.3. Protection of Secured Parties -- 4.2.4. Providing a Structure to Facilitate Fair Negotiation of a Plan -- 4.2.5. Judicial or Other Supervision -- 4.2.6. Shareholders' Interests -- 4.3. Stabilizing and Sustaining Business Operations -- 4.3.1. Financing -- 4.4. Disclosure of Information -- 4.4.1. Who Gathers the Information? -- 4.4.2. What Information andHow Obtained? -- 4.5. Plan: Formulation, Consideration, and Voting -- 4.5.1. Formulation -- 4.5.2. Sponsorship and Negotiation -- 4.5.3. Voting and Classes -- 4.5.4. Pre-packaged Plans -- 4.5.5. Plan Approval -- 4.5.6. Plan: Implementation and Amendment -- 4.5.7. Plan: Discharge and Binding Effects -- 4.6. Conclusion -- Chapter Five: InformalWorkouts and Restructuring -- 5.0. Introduction -- 5.1. What is an Informal Rescue? -- 5.2. Key Elements of a Rescue -- 5.3. Preventive Action -- 5.4. TheMain Aspects of an InformalWorkout -- 5.4.1. Commencing the Process -- 5.4.2. Engaging Advisers -- 5.4.3. Coordinating the Participants -- 5.4.4. Stabilizing the Business -- 5.4.5. Ensuring Adequate Cash Flow -- 5.4.6. Securing Access to Complete and Accurate Information on the Business -- 5.4.7. Negotiating, Agreeing to, and Implementing the Restructuring Plan -- 5.4.8. Dealing with Outside and Dissenting Creditors -- 5.4.9. The Restructuring Agreement must be Legally Binding on all Creditors -- 5.5. SomeWell-Known Informal Rescue and Restructuring Procedures.

5.5.1. Receivership -- 5.5.2. The London Approach -- 5.5.3. The Post-1997 Adaptation for Asia -- 5.5.4. The Pre-Packaged Insolvency Procedure -- 5.6. Conclusion -- Chapter Six: Employee Rights in Insolvency -- 6.0. Introduction -- 6.1. Special Status of Employees -- 6.2. Protecting Employees as Creditors -- 6.2.1. Wages and Benefits -- 6.2.2. Pensions -- 6.3. Personal Liability of Officers and Directors -- 6.4. Employees, Consultation, Participation, and Business Rescue -- 6.4.1. Employee Participation in Large Corporations -- 6.4.2. Employees in the Management of the Insolvency Proceeding -- Chapter Seven: Judicial and Administrative Institutions -- 7.0. Overview -- 7.1. Judiciary -- 7.2. Administrators -- 7.3. Comparative Approaches -- 7.3.1. General Remarks -- 7.3.2. Australia -- 7.3.3. Canada -- 7.3.4. Finland -- 7.3.5. United Kingdom -- 7.3.6. United States -- 7.3.7. Slovakia -- 7.3.8. China -- 7.4. Competence of Insolvency Administrators -- 7.5. Integrity of Administrators -- 7.6. Rules of Compensation of Professionals -- 7.7. Periodic Reports -- Chapter Eight: Cross-Border Considerations -- 8.0. Overview -- 8.1. Fundamental Issues -- 8.1.1. Basic Terminology and Concepts -- 8.1.1.1. Territoriality vs. Universality -- 8.1.1.2. Unitary vs.Multiple Proceedings -- 8.1.2. Jurisdiction -- 8.1.2.1. Determination of theMain Proceeding -- 8.1.2.2. Minimum Requirements for a Non-Main Proceeding -- 8.1.3. Choice of Law -- 8.1.4. Recognition of Foreign Proceedings -- 8.1.4.1. Meaning of Recognition -- 8.1.4.2. Forms of Recognition -- 8.1.4.2.1. No Trust, No Recognition -- 8.1.4.2.2. General Trust -- 8.1.4.2.3. Mid-GroundModifications -- 8.1.4.2.4. Speed and Efficiency of Recognition -- 8.1.4.2.5. Access and Assistance (Effects of Recognition) -- 8.1.4.2.6. International Cooperation -- 8.1.4.2.6.1. General Meaning -- 8.1.4.2.6.2. Modern Meaning.

8.2. International Initiatives -- 8.2.1. UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency -- 8.2.1.1. A Global Impact -- 8.2.1.2. The Basic Ideas -- 8.2.1.3. Universality Principle -- 8.2.1.4. Incompleteness of theModel Law -- 8.2.2. Latin American States -- 8.2.2.1. Contents -- 8.2.2.2. Deficiencies -- 8.2.3. Nordic European States -- 8.2.3.1. Contents -- 8.2.3.2. Achievements and Deficiencies -- 8.2.4. European Union Regulation on Cross-Border Insolvency -- 8.2.4.1. Basic Elements -- 8.2.4.2. Universality Principle -- 8.2.4.3. Restrictions of the Universality Principle -- 8.2.4.4. Deficiencies of the Regulation -- 8.2.5. American Law Institute's Transnational Insolvency Project -- 8.2.5.1. The Approach -- 8.2.5.2. Basic Considerations -- 8.2.5.3. Universality Principle -- 8.2.6. OHADA -- 8.2.6.1. The Project -- 8.2.6.2. Coordination of Several Proceedings -- 8.2.6.3. Recognition and its Consequences -- 8.2.6.4. Incompleteness of the Act -- 8.3. Possible Future Developments -- Bibliography -- 1. Articles -- 2. Books -- 3. Institutional Authors -- Index.
Özet:
We live in an age of economic turmoil. The recent crises emphasize the need for modern, sophisticated rules to govern businesses in financial distress in order to realize value from distressed companies and to protect economic institutions. This book provides information for legislators, policymakers, lawyers, accountants, academics, and administrators who seek to understand the workings of insolvency laws. Guided by the World Bank's Principles and Guidelines, it supplements the work in this field done by UNCITRAL.
Local Note:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
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